Cliff walk continues

(Part 2, 10 Photos) – Ambling onward with the promise of food and beer, the track heads inland around one of the many small, dry creek beds. With less direct sun exposure, these small pockets hold more moisture and ferns flourish.

A small wooden bridge crosses a creek.

We pass the Shot Tower, apparently the world’s tallest circular sandstone tower, built in 1870 to produce lead shot for muskets and pistols. At a height of 192.6 feet (58.7 m), for four years it was the tallest building in Australia, and for one hundred years the tallest in Tasmania!

The Shot Tower at Taroona

This is the first time I’ve walked this track and I expected that it would follow the clifftops more closely for the view, but there were only limited opportunities for access.

Obscured view toward Kingston from the cliff top
The Alum Cliffs track decending to Kingston Beach
Kingston dog beach section. Hey!! Wait up!

We ambled along the beach, crossed the pedestrian bridge and made our way to the Salty Dog for some refreshing beers and a delicious lunch in the sunshine before beginning our return. They have a grassed outdoor dining area where well behaved dogs are welcome.

Browns River, Kingston Beach
Alum Clifftop, the start and end of our walk is the beach on the distant point.
View across the River Derwent to Droughty Point and South Arm.

One thing we had to look forward to on our return … the dreaded steps across the valley next to the Shot Tower. The ones you can see on the opposite side are less than half as they disappear around the corner behind the trees – some 500 or so.

Time to work off those beers …

Once at the top though, it was mostly downhill back to the start of our journey.

Returning to Hinsby Beach, Taroona.

Thanks for visiting, I hope you enjoyed a little stroll in Tasmania.

Today I had the chance for a short wander before work, down in the nearby rivulet to find fungi – and leeches – coming to a post on this site soon. (Not the leeches).

17 thoughts on “Cliff walk continues

    1. We had German Shepherd Ada with us, she’s lurking in the shadows in some of the shots.
      I should point out that no cats are allowed at the pub. OK, I did make that bit up, they’re welcome for dinner 😉

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    1. Thank you, this time of the year it gets windy and some of the gum trees shed their bark, which makes lovely colourful random patterns on their trunks. Its raining now, maybe I’ll edit some fungi photos after breakfast!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. “across to Droughty Point.. “” north of which is Chimamans Bay, slowly being expunged from white colonial history. I’ve left a packet of information brochures in the Rotary Memory seat up there to memorialize the tragedy which occurred just south of Pindos Park. (Go Google Mapping !)

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    1. I haven’t had a chance to get down there, even though I work from Mornington! A deep dive in Google, I eventually found an article:
      “Chinamans Bay
      While not officially named, the sandy beach between Trywork and Droughty Points acquired the name ‘Chinamans Bay’ in the 1850s. The 650 ton Lady Montagu had sailed from Canton bound for Lima with 400 Chinese labourers on board. However, a fever epidemic struck soon after sailing and by the time the ship was off Tasmania, 200 were already dead. Seeking help from Hobart, the captain anchored off Droughty Point, but despite the ship being quarantined, several bodies were dumped overboard. It is said that, as a result, fish caught in the area could not be sold, or even given away.”

      https://www.ourtasmania.com.au/hobart/hobart-geographical.html

      I’m not sure if this is what you are referring too, but it is history that I did not know. Thanks for expanding my knowledge 😀

      I think I’ve actually eaten fish from this area too 😉

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  2. I wish your adventures continue. Love reading about it. The pictures on your post enhance it further and from your narrative, I feel as if I am tagging along with you on these lovely strolls. Your posts are a great escape from the urban settings where I stay. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you so much for the feedback, I’m glad you enjoyed our amble. We try to go somewhere different around once a month, the next walk hasn’t been decided yet but I’m sure we’ll find somewhere interesting – and hopefully with lunch!

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